11 YEARS OF TOURING

7.6.07

Flamenco Express Profile

Flamenco is Music, Sex and History all rolled into one. The fiercest expression of the human spirit ever devised. The Flamenco Express policy is simply to obtain the best flamenco performers available, give them total artistic freedom, and present them to international audiences. The result is an amazing diversity of artistic voices all committed to delivering their own view of the world, in their own unique way, according to how they feel at the time. Which means that every show over the past ten years has been special.

Featuring the Talents of

Ana de los Reyes

















From the sizzling flamenco cauldron of Jerez, and internationally famed for her work with Joaquin Cortés in all the great metropolitan theatres, Ana is the epitome of a modern flamenco singer, a high priestess of duende, enchanting all around her.

‘’In the powerful vocals of Ana de los Reyes there was a feeling that flamenco music had taken off on a roller-coaster ride… exhilarating, but scary’’ Los Angeles Times.

Also Featuring another discovery of the Joaquin Cortes Company

Rosa de las Heras
Trained at the Conservatorio de Madrid under Ciro and subsequently with Rafaela Carrasco and others, Rosa was the find of the Joaquin Cortes company which took the world by storm with their production of Pasión Gitana. After 3 years with Joaquin Rosa went on to dance as a soloist for Compania Alejandro Granados and with Raphael Amargo. She has performed throughout Europe, USA and Japan and been a finalist in the prestigious Certamen Internacional de Danza Española y Flamenco. Rosa joins Flamenco Express for shows in Spring 2006.

















solo: cantinas


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket


Jesus Alvarez
No-one who claims to care about the guitar can miss this chance to hear one of the best guitarists to emerge in the last ten years. A true rising star in the intense guitar scene of Jerez. He has performed and recorded with La Chiqui, El Mono, El Capullo, Diego de Morao, Mijito Hijo and many others. He has recently returned from performances in New Mexico and New York with Manuel and Antonio de la Malena, and from France with flamenco company Viejomundo.

solo: bulerias














He has performed and recorded with La Chiqui, El Mono, El Capullo, Diego de Morao, Mijito Hijo and many others. He has recently returned from performances in New Mexico and New York with Manuel and Antonio de la Malena, and from France with flamenco company Viejomundo.

La Joaquina
solo: solea
Founder member, choreographer and director of Flamenco Express. Trained at Laban and later by Merce Cunningham, Jean Pierre Perrault, Eduardo Lopez, Paco Perez, and Carmen Cortés. She has worked with Christina Hoyos, Paco Peña and others in London, Tokyo, New York, Montreal, Toronto, Paris, Spain and throughout Europe.

'Utterly riveting variations of firecracker beats..tumultuous fervour..indelible gracefulness..'
The Stage


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket


















Mateo Solea
Also from Jerez de la Frontera, his singing career began aged 14 in the Plaza de Toros sharing the stage with Terremoto and Camarón. He went on to sing for many dancers including Manuela Carrasco, Merche Esmeralda and Ana Parrilla. In Madrid he worked in Los Canasteros with La Chana and Juan Ramirez and in Torrebermeja with Jose Merce and Ramon el Portugues. He has toured United States and the UK with Manuel de la Malena, Antonio de la Malena, El Torta, Curro de Jerez and Maria del Mar Moreno. He was recently invited to give a cante recital in the Peña Flamenca Chaqueton in Madrid.

















Gemma de la Cruz
solo: Alegrias
Surrounded by flamenco as a child, she began classes at the age of ten, and went on to study at the Madrid Conservatoire and Studios Amor De Dios alongside Belén Fernandez and Belén Maya. Her Spanish performances include the Teatro Español, Teatro Barcel, Teatro de la Plaza de la Villa, and Teatro de la Zarzuela in Madrid as well as Japanese and UK tours.

















Chris Mullett
solo: Farruca
A founder member and musical director of Flamenco Express and Club Azul, he began playing the guitar at fourteen years old and later studied with Carlos Heredia, Diego Amaya, Gerado Nuñez and Eduardo Lopez. He has performed throughout Britain and Europe with Flamenco Express as well as writing and recording scores for UK theatre and film productions.

















and Special Surprise Guests


Manuel de la Malena


















Last performed with Flamenco Express for la Tati at Hackney Empire, October 2006

Manuel with Dimingo Ortega In Hollywood

No true music lover can pass by the chance to experience Manuel's brand of pure flamenco. His performances reveal flamenco as a truly universal art form, comparable with the highest opera or coolest jazz, and conveys the often tortured, often wonderful history of the gypsy people.
From Jerez De La Frontera, in the 'golden triangle' of flamenco , Manuel is the essence of pure flamenco. A member of the ancient Morao family of gypsy performers , and a descendant of Tio Louis el de la Juliana - one of the originators of modern Flamenco canté – his clan were one of the first to arrive in Spain from India. And when he sings, that deep, colourful history fills the theatre. A regular prizewinner at festivals in France and Spain: el Festival de La Union, Cante Grande de Almeria, National Festival de Cordoba, Cameron de La Isla and many more where he has worked with legends such as Tio Borrico, Antiano Mairena, and Sordera. He is recently returned from a world tour and is currently returned from a world tour, including the Queen Elizabeth Hall, with the Grand Dame of flamenco herself: La Tati. He is chosen by these figureheads of flamenco for, among other qualities, his ability to bring an extra level of performance from everyone who works with him.




El Titi Flores
solo: siguiriya














After completing his studies with some of the great maestros Titi Flores has developed a style based on his extraordinary sense of rhythm. From Arcos de la Frontera and now based in Madrid, he is in demand as a soloist of unique power and grace.


Luis El Mono

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

CUTTINGS


• ‘’In the powerful vocals of Ana de los Reyes there was a feeling that flamenco music had taken off on a roller-coaster ride… exhilarating, but scary’’ - Los Angeles Times.

• "..utterly riveting variations of firecracker beats...tumultuous fervour ..indelible gracefulness.. " - The Stage

• " Delighted the audience, who rewarded them with rapturous applause and encores. " - Dance Europe

• "This fiesty flamenco company deliver the finest in flamenco, plus sizzling soloist, La Joaquina." - Time Out

• "An unforgettable evening." - Anglo Spanish Journal

• "This is a fiery ensemble production where every spark of personality is kept alight and creative diversity is given the space to breathe but remain faithful to flamenco's roots." - King's Lynn News

• “What was surprising, however, was the sheer power and energy displayed by the dancers during this vibrant celebration of Spanish culture. Forget the sterile, regimented flamenco so often served up to tourists: this was the real thing, and to say that it packed a punch is an understatement.”.- South Wales Evening Post

• “Flamenco Express transported the audience to an imaginary Spanish haven during a musical journey laced with passion, grace and immense artistry. The cold, grey and windy weather outside seemed a million miles away.” - Harlow Star

• "Gemma de La Cruz was mesmerizing, with her Spanish charm and graceful moves, displaying the passions of the human spirit with enthuisiastic vigour." - Bristol Evening Post.

• Flamenco refreshes the parts than other dances cannot reach…or so it seems from the response of the audience who witnessed Flamenco Express perform in Staffordshire.
Post-performance people watching bore witness. Fingers drummed tables, hands tapped out rhythmical patterns on the bar, two couples, infused by the flamenco spirit, practised paso doble variations and a number of middle-aged ladies could not resist giving their ‘stamp’ of approval as they left the auditorium. It touches a primal instinct in us all – the rythym of life, with its complex contra beats - an electrical fusion of sound, movement and speed. Flamenco Express put in the plug and switched us on.
Three female dancers in simple attire, two guitarists and two singers recreated the intimate surroundings of the Tablao, a club-like setting within the round of the theatre. This proved an intimate experience, observing the performers from an outer globe – 360 degrees of firecracker footwork and dispossessed arms and hands – as if generated by a force separate to the movement of willowy bodies.
We sat transfixed from the opening martinete, with its deliberate footwork and posturing conjuring up the forge environs which fired its origins, to the high-spirited buleria por fiesta learning towards improvisation from each of its dancers.
In between, we witnessed a solo alegria, from Gemma de la Cruz and two entrancing solos – each indelibly marked with the personalities of performers La Joaquina and Rosa de las Heras.
The layers of Flamenco – dance, song and guitar – were each given their moment in the spotlight. Two amazing guitar solos from Chris Mullet and Jesus Alvarez made string instruments sing with impossible precision. While Ana de los Reyes and Mateo Solea provided a vocal tapestry rich in its scale and dexterity. Flamenco Express has been touring since 1996 and performed more than 250 shows in between educational workshops, classes and specialist choreography for organisations including the Royal Shakespeare Company and Italia Conte School. But each of its performances is different, as they explained. “Flamenco is about telling a story, a conversation on stage, but each is infused with the personality of the performer. As guest performers and members of the company change, they bring with them something new and unique. No performance is ever the same.”
And with this, I have to agree. We witnessed stories unfold and took away a little of the spirit which brought them to life.
Picasso, a great proponent of Flamenco, particularly through his later work in ceramics, would have appreciated the symmetry – returning a little of life’s energy to a theatre on the edge of the Potteries." - Staffordshire Post.

‘Bedford Art-icle’.

The first time I saw a Flamenco dance troop was in 1995 in a small crowded bar in Barcelona. There were only four in the company; a singer, a guitarist and male and female dancers. They sang, played and danced for an hour and a half without a break. The atmosphere in the confines of the bar was hot, steamy and intimate. The performance was done with vigour, artistry and passion, faces contorted with expression, communicating all the anguish, pain, joy and other emotions of the story. Performers and audience alike with beads of sweat dripping from the forehead, down the sides of the face and off the ends of noses and chins. Indeed, the singer was almost crying. It was electric.
Upon reflection I concluded that Flamenco is far more than just a dance. It is a way of life.

My second outing was some years later in the sterile atmosphere of a large concert hall in Munich. The performance inevitably succumbed to the atmosphere of the hall. Technically superb, but sterile.

Flamenco Express laid out their credentials immediately with the opening number which involved the entire company. They trooped onto the floor and commenced without introduction. The powerful voice of Ana de los Reyes boomed out across the rows of an expectant Bedford audience. The flowing skirts of the dancers, the staccato strumming of the guitar, the rhythmical clapping and the sharp, high speed tap, tap tapping of the feet brought it all flooding back.

With eyes closed the performance evoked all the memories and emotion of that bar in Barcelona. The performers doing well to counter the somewhat flat atmosphere of the Corn Exchange. Even without the heat, the intimacy and the sweat, Flamenco Express were never-the-less, as far as I was concerned, the real deal. Highly recommended.

© Manoj Gupta 2007

Flamenco Passion
By Doña Esperanza Bravo Caballo
For one night only in March the Hackney Empire was host to Flamenco Express and came alive to a very Spanish Experience. Flamenco Express tour Britain and Europe to perform an art form that is an essential and all-consuming part of their lives.
The force that drives them is known as ‘duende’ – the inner spirit released in performers’ emotional involvement with their art. Real flamenco is a direct result of the gypsy Diaspora. It is a call for optimism and for an appreciation of the sensual pleasures of life, while at the same time recognising the sad struggle that brought them in the end to the Andalucia, home at one time to a flourishing polyglot civilization. Flamenco combined their own roots in India with Spanish and Arabic influences and it survived many forms of repression to become an ultimate expression of freedom. Unlike the sterile tableaux that are presented to gullible tourists, authentic flamenco never fails to inspire an educated audience.
The group are mainly Spanish, but La Joaquina is from South London and one of the guitarists Chris Mullett is also English. Tomas Arroquero, a dancer, is from Australia but of Spanish descent. Although a diverse group, their biographies indicate they have all studied and performed with some great names in Spain. The end product is as good as any you will see here.
Flamenco is a fusion of elements and styles. Foreign audiences tend to think of it as a dance form only, but in Spain the music and the singing, sometimes without music, are just as if not more important. This group excelled in all three. The singer Mateo Solea who made his debut at the age of 14 was particularly good. The program had a balance of the happier expressions of flamenco known as ‘alegrias’ and the ‘soleares’, one of the oldest forms of flamenco especially in the singing, expressing deep sadness and loneliness. The finale of Fiesta por Buleria by the entire company was spontaneous, but its outward liveliness still maintained the deep inner core touching on sadness which is essential to good flamenco.

Staffordshire Post
New Vic, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire. 2005

Flamenco refreshes the parts than other dances cannot reach…or so it seems from the response of the audience who witnessed Flamenco Express perform in Staffordshire.
Post-performance people watching bore witness. Fingers drummed tables, hands tapped out rhythmical patterns on the bar, two couples, infused by the flamenco spirit, practised paso doble variations and a number of middle-aged ladies could not resist giving their ‘stamp’ of approval as they left the auditorium. It touches a primal instinct in us all – the rythym of life, with its complex contra beats - an electrical fusion of sound, movement and speed. Flamenco Express put in the plug and switched us on.
It was not what I would call a showy performance. Three female dancers in simple attire, two guitarists and two singers recreated the intimate surroundings of the Tablao, a club-like setting within the round of the theatre. This proved an intimate experience, observing the performers from an outer globe – 360 degrees of firecracker footwork and dispossessed arms and hands – as if generated by a force separate to the movement of willowy bodies.
We sat transfixed from the opening martinete, with its deliberate footwork and posturing conjuring up the forge environs which fired its origins, to the high-spirited buleria por fiesta learning towards improvisation from each of its dancers.
In between, we witnessed a solo alegria, from Gemma de la Cruz and two entrancing solos – each indelibly marked with the personalities of performers La Joaquina and Rosa de las Heras.
The layers of Flamenco – dance, song and guitar – were each given their moment in the spotlight. Two amazing guitar solos from Chris Mullet and Jesus Alvarez made string instruments sing with impossible precision. While Ana de los Reyes and Mateo Solea provided a vocal tapestry rich in its scale and dexterity.
Flamenco Express has been touring since 1996 and performed more than 250 shows in between educational workshops, classes and specialist choreography for organisations including the Royal Shakespeare Company and Italia Conte School. But each of its performances is different, as they explained.
“Flamenco is about telling a story, a conversation on stage, but each is infused with the personality of the performer. As guest performers and members of the company change, they bring with them something new and unique. No performance is ever the same.”
And with this, I have to agree. We witnessed stories unfold and took away a little of the spirit which brought them to life.
Picasso, a great proponent of Flamenco, particularly through his later work in ceramics, would have appreciated the symmetry – returning a little of life’s energy to a theatre on the edge of the Potteries.

2005


THE STAGE.
30/4/98
‘FLAMENCO EXPRESS’
Despite the brisk trade in souvenir dolls in frilly dresses, flamenco is not concerned with prettiness. As a dance form, flamenco is arguably one of the best at portraying emotions, and flamenco dancers are not obliged to smile and look happy when they are feeling indelibly blue or simmering with rage. While flamenco enjoys much succes when presented as a theatrical spectacle on a large stage, it works on an altogether more piercing note when performed in an intimate place, and The Spitz, with its bar and flickering candles, provided exactly the right venue to host this work. Comprising two musicians, a singer and five dancers, the performance had an air of spontaneity and one felt that the artists were improvising, reacting to the mood of the audience rather than adhering to any set regime.
The tremendous voice of Manuel De La Malena - billed as ‘The James Brown of Flamenco’ - added a distinct weight to the evening. But for me, the leading guitarist* (whom I cannot name as there was no programme), whose fingers coaxed the most moving sounds I have ever heard anyone wrest from a guitar, provided the most brilliant musical contribution. His solo in the second half was pure heaven.
Leading the dancers, La Joaquina, tiny, urgent and intense, explored a vast emotional vocabulary, and juxtaposed vulnerability and tenderness with violence and aggression. Her feet rattle off tempestuous beats, her sinewy arms snake angrily and her taut body is totally driven by her feelings. Wild and untameable, there is certainly no empty prettiness in her dance. EMMA MANNING

LABAN. APRIL 08

‘POWERFUL GRACE and DYNAMIC RHYTHM’ by Megan Millar-McKeever for Remotegoat
Passion, drama, and hot summer nights. These are the things that come to mind when one thinks of flamenco dancing. What Flamenco Express added to this list of attributes was grace, strength and humour. If you have never been exposed to flamenco dancing before seeing this company perform is a great place to start, and if you are a connoisseur then you are guaranteed to have an enjoyable evening.
This small company, comprised of four dancers and four musicians, created a dynamic performance last Thursday night at the LABAN Theatre. The female dancers began the evening with a vibrant group piece, followed by a series of solo performances. Their steps provided a rhythm for the music created by the sweet sounds of the acoustic guitarists and the rough vocals of the singers. Through the performance the music built in speed and intensity seducing the listener while the dancers captivated with their powerful grace.
The impression the performers left on the audience was apparent as members of the audience rose to their feet applauding and children tapped away in the isles in an attempt to mimic what they had just seen. If you love dance, Spain or listening to a wicked acoustic guitar this show is a definite must see. I had a fantastic time and would recommend it to anyone.

Remotegoat. 2008

“A small company of three dancers and four musicians filled the stage as if they were performing at a much bigger location yet kept intact the intimacy of the venue.
With a programme of traditional flamenco performed with unconventional interpretations, they managed to transport the audience not to the tacky Spanish holiday resorts of the 1970s but to the darker heart of the Iberian gipsy soul.
The dances were packed full of energy (exhausting the audience as much as the performers) and displayed impeccable precision and timing. Mention must be given to guitarist Jesus Alvarez whose dexterity and musicianship were stunning.”

Portsmouth News 2008

Flamenco Express Full Performance List. 1996 >

  • Club Azul. 1994-96
  • Flamenco Express British Performances 1996 > 2008
  • Union Chapel London. 20/6/96
  • Bull Arts Centre Barnet. 21/9/96
  • Turtle Key Arts Centre London. 27/9/96
  • The Brix Brixton London. 13/10/96
  • The Brix Brixton London. 5/11/96
  • Jackson’s Lane Centre, London. 23/11/96
  • Chat’s Palace, London. 18/1/97
  • North Westminster C.C. London. 30/1/97
  • Wyvern Theatre Swindon. 31/1/97
  • Spa Pavillion Felixstowe. 15/2/97
  • Beck Theatre Hayes. 31/3/97
  • Chipping Norton Theatre. 19/4/97
  • White Cliffs Theatre Dover. 20/5/97
  • Playhouse Studio Harlow. 23/5/97
  • Spitz Venue Spitalfields London 7/8/97
  • White Rock Theatre Hastings. 15/8/97
  • Spa Pavillion Felixstowe. 16/8/97
  • Library Theatre Luton. 9/9/97
  • Beck Theatre Hayes. 13/9/97
  • Bull Arts Centre Barnet. 20/9/97
  • Bedford Corn Exchange Bedford. 27/9/97
  • Bridport Arts Centre Bridport. 10/10/97
  • Forest Arts Centre New Milton. 11/10/97
  • Royal Spa Centre Leamington Spa. 15/10/97
  • Guildhall Arts Centre Gloucester. 25/10/97
  • Old Town Hall Hemel Hempstead. 4/11/97
  • Old Town Hall Hemel Hempstead. 5/11/97
  • Spring Gardens High Wycombe. 15/11/97
  • Trinity Arts Centre Tunbridge Wells. 22/11/97
  • Redgrave Theatre Farnham. 23/11/97
  • Princes Theatre Clacton. 9/2/98
  • Brentwood Theatre Brentwood. 21/2/98
  • Castle Theatre Wellingborough. 27/2/98
  • Kingston Bagpuize Hall Kingston Bagpuize. 28/2/98
  • Penny Theatre Canterbury. 6/3/98
  • Spitz Venue Spitalfields London 8/4/98
  • Clair Hall Hayward’s Heath. 15/4/98
  • Woughton Centre Milton Keynes. 18/4/98
  • Woodville Halls Gravesend. 22/4/98
  • Rhoda McGaw Theatre Woking. 24/4/98
  • NottDance ‘98 Nottingham. 11-14/5/98
  • Pleasance Theatre, London. 25/5/98
  • Cricklade Theatre Andover. 4/6/98
  • New Theatre Royal Portsmouth. 13/6/98
  • Pavilion Theatre Worthing. 27/6/98
  • De La Warr Pavilion Bexhill. 4/9/98
  • Bedford Corn Exchange Bedford. 12/9/98
  • Stag Theatre Sevenoaks. 18/9/98
  • Miskin Theatre Dartford. 25/9/98
  • Queen’s Theatre Barnstaple. 10/10/98
  • Brook Theatre Chatham. 17/10/98
  • Rhoda McGaw Theatre Woking. 19/10/98
  • Penny Theatre Canterbury. 22/10/98
  • Alban Arena St Albans. 24/10/98
  • Royal Spa Centre Leamington Spa. 29/10/98
  • Horsham Arts Centre Horsham. 30/10/98
  • Trinity Arts Centre Tunbridge Wells. 31/10/98
  • Secombe Theatre Sutton. 6/11/98
  • Dorchester Hotel London. 14/11/98
  • Playhouse Harlow. 19/11/98
  • Spitz Venue Spitalfields London. 21/11/98
  • Corn Exchange Newbury Berks. 28/1/99
  • GDA Greenwich London. 5/2/99
  • Penny Theatre Canterbury Kent. 12/2/99
  • Waterman’s Arts Centre Brentford. 19/2/99
  • Millfield Theatre Edmonton London. 25/2/99
  • Watersmeet Theatre Rickmansworth. 26/2/99
  • Point Arts Centre Eastleigh. 28/2/99
  • Mill Arts Centre Banbury. 10/3/99
  • Roses Theatre Tewkesbury. 26/3/99
  • Castle Theatre Wellingborough. 10/4/99
  • Trinity Arts Cente Tunbridge Wells. 14/4/99
  • Wyllyot’s Centre Potter’s Bar. 16/4/99
  • Spitz Venue Spitalfields London. 17/4/99
  • New Theatre Royal Portsmouth. 23/4/99
  • Woodville Halls Gravesend. 30/4/99
  • Maddermarket Theatre Norwich. 16/5/99
  • Princess Theatre Hunstanton. 3/7/99
  • Harlequin Theatre Redhill. 10/9/99
  • Hazlitt Theatre Maidstone. 17/9/99
  • Oakengates Theatre Telford. 18/9/99
  • Redgrave Theatre Bristol. 25/9/99
  • Harrow Arts Centre Harrow. 26/9/99
  • Woughton Centre Milton Keynes. 2/10/99
  • ‘Y’ Theatre Leicester. 8/10/99
  • Darwin Suite Derby. 15/10/99
  • New Theatre Royal Portsmouth. 6/11/99
  • Cochrane Theatre London. 13/11/99
  • Anglo Spanish Society London. 15/11/99
  • Epsom Playhouse Epsom. 19/11/99
  • Palace Theatre Newark. 25/11/99
  • Playhouse Harlow. 7/11/99
  • King’s Lynn Arts Centre King’s Lynn. 2/12/99
  • The Spitz London. 3/12/99
  • Greenwich Dance Agency Greenwich. 11/12/99
  • Wembley Conference Centre London. 7/1/00
  • Theatre Royal Bury St Edmunds. 5/2/00
  • Camberley Arts Link Camberley. 8/2/00
  • Anglia Polytechnic University Cambridge. 11/2/00
  • Waterman’s Arts Centre Brentford. 13/2/00
  • Gordon Craig Theatre Stevenage. 22/2/00
  • Park Royal Hotel London. 7/4/00
  • Shrewsbury Music Hall Shrewsbury. 29/4/00
  • Horsham Arts Centre Horsham. 6/5/00
  • Royal Spa Centre Leamington Spa. 19/5/00
  • Millfield Theatre Edmonton. 6/7/00
  • Chequer Mead Arts Centre East Grinstead. 22/9/00
  • Mick Jagger Centre Dartford. 7/10/00
  • The Brewhouse Burton on Trent. 13/10/00
  • Library Theatre Solihull. 20/10/00
  • Robertsbridge Festival Robertsbridge. 28/10/00
  • New Theatre Royal Portsmouth. 10/11/00
  • Roses Theatre Tewkesbury. 11/11/00
  • Neptune Theatre Liverpool. 17/11/00
  • Hackney Empire London. 19/11/00
  • Dorking Halls Dorking. 30/11/00
  • Greenwich Dance Agency London. 2/12/00
  • Bedford Corn Exchange Bedford. 2/2/01
  • Stantonbury Campus Theatre Milton Keynes. 9/2/01
  • Beaufort Theatre Ebbw Vale. 10/2/01
  • Playhouse Harlow. 17/2/01
  • Stag Theatre Sevenoaks. 23/2/01
  • Marlowe Theatre Canterbury. 9/3/01
  • Darwin Suite Derby. 7/3/01
  • Wilde Theatre Bracknell. 23/3/01
  • Harlequin Theatre Redhill. 20/4/01
  • Taliesin Arts Centre Swansea. 25/5/01
  • The Compass Theatre Ickenham. 2/6/01
  • Ashcroft Theatre Croydon. 9/6/01
  • King’s Lynn Arts Centre King’s Lynn. 15/6/01
  • Theatre Royal Bath. 15/7/01
  • Temple Bar Properties Dublin. 29/7/01
  • Buxton Opera House Buxton. 2/9/01
  • Town Hall Theatre Loughborough. 9/9/01
  • Gordon Craig Theatre, Stevenage. 29/9/01
  • Palace Theatre, Redditch, Worcs. 6/10/01
  • Maddermarket Theatre, Norwich. 14/10/01
  • Epsom Playhouse, Epsom, Surrey. 26/10/01
  • The Swan Theatre, Worcester. 16/11/01
  • The Belgrade Theatre, Coventry. 17/11/01
  • Rhoda McGaw Theatre, Woking. 23/11/01
  • Neptune Theatre, Liverpool. 30/11/01
  • Playhouse, Harlow. 9/2/02
  • Palace Theatre, Newark. 8/3/02
  • Arts in Rural Gloucestershire. 9/3/02
  • Hazlitt Theatre, Maidstone. 16/3/02
  • Arts in Rural Gloucestershire. 23/3/02
  • Theatr Hafren, Newtown. 19/4/02
  • South Holland Arts Centre. Spalding. 24/4/02
  • Roses Theatre, Tewkesbury. 24/5/02
  • Octagon Theatre, Yeovil. 31/5/02
  • Camberley Theatre, Camberley, Surrey. 1/6/02
  • Theatre Royal, Northampton. 8/6/02
  • Norden Farm Centre for the Arts. 6/6/02
  • Theatre Royal, Bath. 16/6/02
  • Hall for Cornwall, Truro. 5/7/02
  • Opera House, St Helier, Jersey. 14/7/02
  • Angel Theatre, Woodbridge. 27/7/02
  • Swan Theatre, Worcester. 11/9/02
  • Watersmeet Theatre, Rickmansworth. 27/9/02
  • Queen’s Hall Edinburgh. 19/10/02
  • New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich. 27/10/02
  • Gaiety Theatre, Douglas Isle Of Man. 1/11/02
  • Stag Theatre, Sevenoaks. 2/2/03
  • Kenneth More Theatre, Ilford. 26/2/03
  • Crescent Theatre, Birmingham. 15/3/03
  • Bridport Arts Centre. Bridport. 23/3/03
  • QEH Theatre, Bristol. 29/3/03
  • Evesham Arts Centre, Worcs. 4/4/03
  • Bull Arts Centre, Barnet. 12/4/03
  • Coliseum Theatre, Oldham. 17/4/03
  • Wilde Theatre, Bracknell. 19/4/03
  • Opera House, Cork. 27/4/03
  • Theatre Royal, Bath. 1/6/03
  • Windmill Arts Centre, Littlehampton, Sussex. 2/7/03
  • Opera House, Buxton, Derbyshire. 27/8/03
  • King’s Lynn Arts Centre, King’s Lynn. 26/9/03
  • Harlow Playhouse. 17/10/03
  • Norden Farm Centre for the Arts. 18/10/03
  • Greenwich Dance Agency. 19/10/03
  • Queen’s Theatre, Barnstaple. 7/2/04
  • Laban Centre, London. 13/2/04
  • Trinity Arts Centre, Tunbridge Wells. 14/2/04
  • Ashcroft Arts Centre, Fareham, Hants. 28/2/04
  • The Gatehouse, Stafford. 13/3/04
  • New Wolsey Theatre, Ipswich. 8/4/04
  • The Palace Theatre, Newark. 16/4/04
  • Roses Theatre, Tewkesbury. 23/4/04
  • Castle Theatre, Wellingborough. 28/5/04
  • Swan Theatre, Worcester. 21/8/04
  • Music Hall, Shrewsbury. 29/10/04
  • Paul Robeson Theatre Hounslow. 30/10/04
  • Hackney Empire, London. 3/3/05
  • Theatre Royal, Bath. 6/3/05
  • Quay Arts Centre, Newport, Isle Of Wight. 23/4/05
  • Q.E.H. Theatre, Bristol. 21/5/05
  • Number 8 Community Arts Centre, Pershore. 14/5/05
  • Laban. London. 27/7/05
  • Everyman Theatre, Cheltenham. 15/9/05
  • Bedford Corn Exchange. 16/9/05
  • Civic Hall, Stratford Upon Avon. 17/9/05
  • Phoenix Theatre, Leicester. 23/9/05
  • New Victoria Theatre, Newcastle Under Lyme. 31/10/05
  • Epsom Playhouse. 17/11/05
  • New Cut Arts Centre. 4/2/06
  • Arts Depot. Finchley. London. 27/2/06
  • Roses Theatre, Tewkesbury. 1/4/06
  • Norden Farm Arts Centre, Maidenhead. 15/6/06
  • Swan Theatre, Worcester. 16/6/06
  • Romani Roots Festival. Chichester. 6/09/06.
  • Ashcroft Theatre. Fareham. 21/09/06.
  • De La Warr Pavillion. Bexhill. 23/9/06
  • Artrix. Bromsgrove. 29/09/06
  • Trinity Theatre Tunbridge Wells. 14/10/06.
  • New Hackney Empire. 15/10/06
  • Harrogate Theatre. 19/1/07
  • The Brindley, Runcorn. Cheshire. 16/3/07
  • The Roses, Tewkesbury. 17/3/07
  • The Amersham. New Cross. London. 18/3/07
  • The Opera House. Buxton. 9/4/07
  • Truck Theatre, Hull. 15/10/07
  • Palace Theatre, Newark. 16/10/07
  • Corn Exchange, Bedford. 23/11/07
  • Derby Dance Centre. 24/11/07
  • Tramshed Theatre, Woolwich, 25/11/07
  • Hextable Dance. Swanley, Kent. 1/12/07
  • Theatre Royal. Wakefield. 26/1/08
  • Belgrade Theatre, Coventry. 7-9th Feb 08
  • Devonshire Park Theatre, Eastbourne. 29/3/08
  • Haymarket Theatre, Basingstoke. 4/4/08
  • Arts Depot, Finchley, London. 5/4/08
  • Laban. London. 17/4/08
  • Marlowe Theatre, Coventry. 18/4/08
  • Victoria Hall, Stoke On Trent. 25/4/08
  • Landmark Arts. Teddington. London. 23/5/08
  • Little Theatre, Sheringham. 24/5/08.
  • Pavilion Theatre, Worthing. 22/6/08
  • Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch. 23/6/08
  • New Theatre Royal. Portsmouth. 24/6/08
  • Swan Theatre, Worcester. 25/8/08
  • Bridport Arts Centre. 13/9/08
  • Roses Theatre, Tewkesbury. 6/2/09
  • Artrix. Bromsgrove. 7/2/09
  • Peña Flamenca De Londres. 8/2/09
  • New Vic Theatre. Newcastle Under Lyme.. 9/2/09
  • New Cut Arts Centre, Halesworth, Suffolk. 17.04.09
  • The Theatre, Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire. 8.04.09


  • 2 comments:

    Anonymous said...

    hi guys,its alan youre old driver yesteryear.hope you are all well,would love to meet you all again. im living in cheltenham now, looking to see you the next time you play at the roses in tewkesbury. all the best to you in the future. you are ALWAYS IN MY THOUGHTS. LOVE YOU ALL.

    amjamjazz said...

    Alan!

    We all still think of you. Glad to hear you're going strong.
    We're in Worcester in August if that's any use. But I'm sure we'll be back in Tewkesbury soon.

    You can contact us direct anytime via the address on the website.